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Allen Stewart and Lydia Bucilla Males and their children.
Allen Stewart and Lydia Bucilla Males and their children.
Front row left to right: Mary Susan Stewart (1872-1919),Allen Stewart (1840-1912),Lydia Bucilla Males (1836-1908).
Standing, left to right: Sarah Pearl Stewart (1869-1936),Elizabeth L. Stewart (1871-1920),Thomas Males Stewart (1874-1946),Milton Van Ozza "Jake" Stewart 1877-1958).  
 
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Anna Mary Stewart
Anna Mary Stewart
(1861-1947) 
 
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Anna Mary Stewart
Anna Mary Stewart
(1861-1947) 
 
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Anthony McKinney
Anthony McKinney
(1831-1901) 
 
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Barbara Miller
Barbara Miller
(1812-1904) 
 
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Benjamin Miller
Benjamin Miller
 
 
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Betty Jo Stewart
Betty Jo Stewart
Graduation - 1960 
 
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Brady Sheldon Stewart
Brady Sheldon Stewart
(1870-1952) 
 
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Brady Sheldon Stewart
Brady Sheldon Stewart
(1870-1952) 
 
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Brady's Ben
Brady's Ben
Allegheny River at East Brady, Clarion County, Pennsylvania.
Taken during a visit to Clarion County in summer of 1993.

Brady's Bend, also known as Bradys Bend,[1] is named for Captain Samuel Brady (1756–1795), famed frontier scout and the subject of many legends. Near this location on the Allegheny River in Western Pennsylvania June 1779—in what was then Seneca territory – Brady led a force seeking to redress the killing of a settler and her four children, and the taking of two children as prisoners. The force surrounded a party of seven Indians—apparently both Seneca and Munsee – killing their leader (a Munsee warrior) and freeing the two children.

When Peter Henry was fourteen years of age, their home, six miles from Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was attacked by a band of marauding Indians, and his mother and the two youngest children were killed. Peter and two younger children were taken prisoners by the savages, but they had proceeded only a short distance when the youngest child began to cry and was immediately tomahawked. The Indians carried Peter and his sister to the point since known as Brady's Bend, where they went into camp. The redoubtable Captain Brady, at the head of a party of scouts, had followed the savages, attacked them in the night while asleep, and only one of the band escaped to tell the tale. Brady took the children to Fort Pitt, and subsequently delivered them safe to their father.
Brady and his party painted themselves, donned Indian dress, crossed the Allegheny and advanced up its west side, carefully examining the mouths of all its principal tributaries, especially the eastern ones. On reaching a point opposite the Mahoning Creek, they discovered the Indians' canoes moored at the southwestern bank of the creek. Here just below the "great bend" in the middle of June 1779, Brady was about to experience one of his most notable and successful Indian fights.

The outcome of Brady's fight was reported by Colonel Brodhead via letter on June 24 to President Reed (first chief executive of Pennsylvania) and to General Washington, June 26, 1779.

With the help of the Delaware Chief Nanowland who was his ally against the Senecas, Captain Brady fell in with seven Indians of this party—that had committed the depredations at Sewickly—about fifteen miles above Kittaning, from the site of Fort Armstrong (Pennsylvania), where the Indians had chosen an advantageous situation for their camp. He surrounded them and attacked at break of day. Subsequently he killed the Indian captain, who was a notorious warrior of the Munsee nation, and mortally wounded most of them; but they being encamped near a remarkable thicket, and having as customary with them, stopped their wounds just after they received them, could not be found. Captain Brady retook six horses, the two prisoners, the scalps, all their plunder, all the Indians' guns, tomahawks, match-coats, and moccasins.
The two prisoners were Peter and Margaret Henry, ten- and twelve-year-old[5] children of Frederick Henry. They had been captives for about two weeks before they were rescued by Brady's party. Peter Henry settled in Butler County, Pennsylvania. He was a member of Captain Abraham Brinker's company under Colonel John Purviance at Erie, Pennsylvania in the War of 1812.

He was a farmer, raised a large family and was highly respected. He died in his ninety-fourth year in 1858. Margaret Henry married and lived in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.

(Source - Excerpts from article in Wikipedia.)
 
 
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Carmen Polliard and Family 1940
Carmen Polliard and Family 1940
Back row, left to right; Jay Myers, Carmen Polliard, Frank Polliard, Eugene Polliard, Bob Polliard, Charlie Laughlin, George Polliard, Charles Laughlin. Third row, left to right; Ruth Polliard, Florence Polliard, Maye Polliard, Ethel Polliard, Lulu McDonald.Second row, left to right; Jane Blair, Louise Laughlin, Romaine Laughlin, Ethel Maye Myers. Front row, left to right; Mary Jane Polliard, Mary Lou Polliard, Janet Polliard, Shirley Myers. 
 
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Carmen Polliard and Idella Stewart
Carmen Polliard and Idella Stewart
Carmen Polliard and Ruth Idella Stewart family at the time of their 25th Wedding Annivesary in 1914; Frank and Lulu McDonald Polliard, Floyd Phillips (child with hat, son of Flo and Ben Phillips, Ruth Polliard, Robert Polliard, Eugene Polliard (child in center), Flo and Ben Phillips. 
 
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Carmen Polliard and Idella Stewart family and friends.
Carmen Polliard and Idella Stewart family and friends.
Back row, left to right; Isaac and Nancy Pollock Hilliard, Idella Stewart, Frank Polliard, Carmen Polliard, Lulu McDonald (George Polliard in Lulu's arms. Front row, left to right; Mrs. Griffin and daugher, Robert Polliard, Charles and Ruth Laughlin. 
 
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Carmen Polliard and Ruth Idella Stewart.
Carmen Polliard and Ruth Idella Stewart.
Back row, left to right; Frank Polliard, Robert Polliard Senior, Eugene Polliard. Front row, left to right; Ruth Stewart, Carmen Polliard, Flo Polliard.
 
 
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Carmen Polliard Farm
Carmen Polliard Farm
 
 
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Catherine McDonald
Catherine McDonald
 
 
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Chalmers Carlton Stewart
Chalmers Carlton Stewart
(1898-1967) 
 
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Charles Fremont Craig
Charles Fremont Craig
With his two sons. 
 
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Charles Fremont Craig and Minnie Mae Anderson
Charles Fremont Craig and Minnie Mae Anderson
 
 
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Charles William Cole
Charles William Cole
1898-1937) 
 
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Charles William Stewart Peters and Edith P. Harmon
Charles William Stewart Peters and Edith P. Harmon
At the pump shack, Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 
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Charles William Stewart Peters and Edith P. Harmon Wedding
Charles William Stewart Peters and Edith P. Harmon Wedding
1899 Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 
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Charles William Stewart Peters and son Clarence Harmon Peters
Charles William Stewart Peters and son Clarence Harmon Peters
Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 
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Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
 
 
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Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania (circa 1908)
Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania (circa 1908)
Parking area.  
 
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Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania (circa 1910)
Cherry Run Camp Grounds, Clarion County, Pennsylvania (circa 1910)
Standing left to right: Mrs. Gill Polliard/Mrs. Pearl Masters/Clarence Masters/Mrs. Flick/Frank McCall/Gill Polliard/John Elder/Paul McCall/Ben Flick/Mrs. John Elder/Harry Polliard/William Stewart(Art)/Clara Zilafroe/Don Stewart/Pearl Rickard/Vernon Stitt/Frank Rickard/Galen Stewart/Raymond Elder/Orland McCall/Mrs. Mohney.

Second row seated left to right: Arch Mohney/Brady Stewart/Elmer Weeder/Lucille Weeder/Mrs. Elmer Weeder/Mrs. John Polliard/Etta Lusher/John Polliard/Kitty Stewart/Mrs. Frank Sherman (husband took picture).

First row seated left to right: Agnew Mohney/Horace Zilafroe/Carrie Waite/Reverend John Waite, visiting Presbyterian Minister/Amos Polliard/Bertha Polliard/Grace McCall/Hazel McCall.

First row seated six girls to the right-from left to right: Amos Polliard/Mrs. Lusher/Mrs. Frank McCall/Ruth Elder/Edith Elder/Mae Elder.

* * * * *

"My great aunt Lulu McDonald Polliard (1893-1989) talked about the religious tent meetings at Cherry Run. As a child they either went to one of the churches, which one had the minister that week, or the tent meetings. (I have a diary of George Williams McDonald where he indicated who was the minister each Sunday.) When they went to the tent meetings they went visiting among the family and friends. When they didn'd go to either they were not allowed to go anywhere. She still practiced that even in her later life. And they had a lot of visiting relatives according to GW's diary. Seth C. Stewart had the downstairs bedroom reserved for the visiting minister." (Furnished by Cheryl B. McDonald)  
 
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Cherry Run Cleaing Crew
Cherry Run Cleaing Crew
 
 
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Cherry Run Cleaning Crew Lineup
Cherry Run Cleaning Crew Lineup
 
 
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Civil War
Civil War
Battle Flag of 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps, the Army of the Potomac.  
 
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Civil War - In the foreground, stone pier remains of the 5,960 ft. covered bridge that spanned the Susquehanna River between Columbia and Wrightsville, Pennsylvania prior to the Gettysburg campaign.
Civil War - In the foreground, stone pier remains of the 5,960 ft. covered bridge that spanned the Susquehanna River between Columbia and Wrightsville, Pennsylvania prior to the Gettysburg campaign.
On June 28, 1863, during the Gettysburg Campaign, the bridge was burned by Columbia residents and the Pennsylvania state militia to prevent Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia from entering Lancaster County. Lee had hoped to invade Harrisburg from the west and move eastward to Lancaster and Philadelphia, and in the process destroy railroad yards and other facilities. Under General Jubal Early’s command and following Lee’s orders, General John B. Gordon was to place Lancaster and the surrounding farming area “under contribution” for the Confederate Army’s war supplies and to attack Harrisburg from the east side of the river while Lee’s army advanced from the west side. General Early was given orders to burn the bridge but hoped instead to capture it, while Union forces under the command of Colonel Jacob G. Frick and Major General Granville O. Haller, hoping to save the bridge, were forced to burn it. With the route to Lancaster blocked, and the Union Army of the Potomac closer than Lee had earlier estimated, the Confederate troops were ordered to withdraw to the “little known crossroads” of Gettysburg to rendezvous with Lee and regroup with other contingents of the Confederate Army. If the bridge had not been burned, the two opposing armies may not have met at Gettysburg where the pivotal three-day battle was fought and the latter course of the Civil War was determined. 
 
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Civil War - Monument of 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Gettysburg
Civil War - Monument of 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Gettysburg
From the Ayers Avenue (Wheatfield) Monument.
The 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps, the Army of the Potomac.

"The Regiment engaged the enemy on this position in the afternoon of July 2nd 1863."

"Present at Gettysburg 468 offices and men. Killed and died of wounds, 2 officers, 25 men. Wounded, 5 officers, 88 men. Captured or missing, 5 men. Total 125."

"Some of the deadliest fighting of the Battle of Gettysburg took place in the now famous Wheatfield. James Longstreet's I Corps attacked Federal soldiers from Daniel Sickles' III Corps. For over three hours, six Confederate brigades attacked and counterattacked 13 Union brigades from four different Federal corps. Several generals were mortally wounded, and the fighting bogged down into a regiment-by-regiment, man-to-man engagement. When the smoke cleared and the fighting ceased on the evening of July 2, 1863, the 26 acres of wheat owned by George Rose had been destroyed, with the dead and wounded strewn all about." Neither side gained control of the ground, but many men gave their lives trying.  
 
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Civil War - The 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg
Civil War - The 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg
A painting by John Paul Strain. Generals Hancock and Caldwell of the 2nd Corps watch as General Sickles of the 3rd Corps makes his ill fated march into the wheat field at Gettysburg on July 2nd, 1863. Caldwell’s 1st Division would be sent to rescue Sickles.

Among the regiments in Caldwell’s division was the 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.

See Notes Section on Jeremiah Zachariah Brown for his comments on the march to Gettysburg on June 28, 1863 and the position of Company K of the 148th in the Wheatfield on the farm of John Rose (230 acres of which 26 were planted in wheat) at Gettysburg.

The battle flag to the right in the painting is that of the II Corps. The battle flag to the left contains a trefoil, the symbol of the II Corps. It is the same design as that on the Momument to the 148th at the Gettysburg National Military Park.


Some Additional Comments on The Wheatfield.

Initial assault on the Wheatfield.

The area known as the Wheatfield had three geographic features, all owned by the John Rose family: the 20 acre field itself, Rose Woods bordering it on the west, and a modest elevation known as Stony Hill, also to the west. Immediately to the southeast was Houck's Ridge and to the south Devil's Den. The fighting here, consisting of numerous confusing attacks and counterattacks over two hours by eleven brigades, earned the field the nickname "Bloody Wheatfield”.

The first engagement in the Wheatfield was actually that of Anderson's brigade (Hood's division) attacking the 17th Maine of Trobriand's brigade, a spillover from Hood's attack on Houck's Ridge. Although under pressure and with its neighboring regiments on Stony Hill withdrawing, the 17th Maine held its position behind a low stone wall with the assistance of Winslow's battery, and Anderson fell back. Trobriand wrote, "I had never seen any men fight with equal obstinacy."

By 5:30 p.m., when the first of Kershaw's regiments neared the Rose farmhouse, Stony Hill had been reinforced by two brigades of the 1st Division, V Corps, under Brig. Gen. James Barnes, those of Cols. William S. Tilton and Jacob B. Sweitzer. Kershaw's men placed great pressure on the 17th Maine, but it continued to hold. For some reason, however, Barnes withdrew his under strength division about 300 yards (270 m) to the north—without consultation with Birney's men—to a new position near the Wheatfield Road. Trobriand and the 17th Maine had to follow suit, and the Confederates seized Stony Hill and streamed into the Wheatfield. (Barnes's controversial decision was widely criticized after the battle, and it effectively ended his military career.)

Earlier that afternoon, as Meade realized the folly of Sickles's movement, he ordered Hancock to send a division from the II Corps to reinforce the III Corps. Hancock sent the 1st Division under Brig. Gen. John C. Caldwell from its reserve position behind Cemetery Ridge. It arrived at about 6 p.m. and three brigades, under Cols. Samuel K. Zook, Patrick Kelly (the Irish Brigade), and Edward E. Cross moved forward; the fourth brigade, under Col. John R. Brooke, was in reserve. Zook and Kelly drove the Confederates from Stony Hill, and Cross cleared the Wheatfield, pushing Kershaw's men back to the edge of Rose Woods. Both Zook and Cross were mortally wounded in leading their brigades through these assaults, as was Confederate Semmes. When Cross's men had exhausted their ammunition, Caldwell ordered Brooke to relieve them. By this time, however, the Union position in the Peach Orchard had collapsed (see next section), and Wofford's assault continued down the Wheatfield Road, taking Stony Hill and flanking the Union forces in the Wheatfield. Brooke's brigade in Rose Woods had to retreat in some disorder. Sweitzer's brigade was sent in to delay the Confederate assault, and they did this effectively in vicious hand-to-hand combat. The Wheatfield changed hands once again.
Confederates seize the Wheatfield.

Additional Union troops had arrived by this time. The 2nd Division of the V corps, under Brig. Gen. Romeyn B. Ayres, was known as the Regular Division because two of its three brigades were composed of U.S. Army (regular army) troops, not state volunteers. (The brigade of volunteers, under Brig. Gen. Stephen H. Weed, was already engaged on Little Round Top, so only the regular army brigades arrived at the Wheatfield.) In their advance across the Valley of Death they had come under heavy fire from Confederate sharpshooters in Devil's Den. As the regulars advanced, the Confederates swarmed over Stony Hill and through Rose Woods, flanking the newly arrived brigades. They retreated back to the relative safety of Little Round Top in good order, despite heavy casualties and pursuing Confederates. The two regular brigades suffered 829 casualties out of 2,613 engaged.

This final Confederate assault through the Wheatfield continued past Houck's Ridge into the Valley of Death at about 7:30 p.m. The brigades of Anderson, Semmes, and Kershaw were exhausted from hours of combat in the summer heat and advanced east with units jumbled up together. Wofford's brigade followed to the left along the Wheatfield Road. As they reached the northern shoulder of Little Round Top, they were met with a counterattack from the 3rd Division (the Pennsylvania Reserves) of the V Corps, under Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford. The brigade of Col. William McCandless, including a company from the Gettysburg area, spearheaded the attack and drove the exhausted Confederates back beyond the Wheatfield to Stony Hill. Realizing that his troops were too far advanced and exposed, Crawford pulled the brigade back to the east edge of the Wheatfield.

The bloody Wheatfield remained quiet for the rest of the battle. But it took a heavy toll on the men who traded possession back-and-forth. The Confederates suffered casualties of 1,394 and the Union 3,215 (not a typical ratio of attackers to defenders). Some of the wounded managed to crawl to Plum Run but could not cross it. The river ran red with their blood. As with the Cornfield at Antietam, this small expanse of agricultural ground would be remembered by veterans as a name of unique significance in the history of warfare.
 
 
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Civil War Memorial Dedication
Civil War Memorial Dedication
Civil War Veterans Dedicating Memorial at Grandview Cemetery, Sligo, Clarion County, Pennsylvania. 
 
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Civil War Memorial Recent View
Civil War Memorial Recent View
Grandview Cemetery, Sligo, Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 
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Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Unknown School Children 
 
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Clarion River
Clarion River
Alum Rock, Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 
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Clyde Gale Stewart and Esther Estelle Lerch
Clyde Gale Stewart and Esther Estelle Lerch
50th Wedding Anniversary - 1972 
 
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Colonel Calvin Augustus Craig
Colonel Calvin Augustus Craig
(1833 - 1864)
Mortally wounded in battle at Deep Botttom, Henrico County, Virginia on August 16, 1864 while in command of the Second Brigade, Third Division of the Second Corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. He died the following day at nearby City Point, Virginia.  
 
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Concord Presbyterian Church, Perry Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Concord Presbyterian Church, Perry Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Centennial Celebration June 24, 1908 
 
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Connell McCall Sewart
Connell McCall Sewart
 
 
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County Donegal, Ireland
County Donegal, Ireland
In 1611 Sir William Stewart built Fort Stewart as a defence along the shores of Lough Swilly. When another planter Sir Richard Hansard moved to Lifford, Stewart acquired Hansard's Ramelton estates.

In 1623 he was made a baronet and granted the castle of Ramelton, becoming the biggest landowner in the town. He also gained valuable fishing rights on Lough Swilly.

Donegal had become a county in 1585, and Sir William Stewart was one of the county's three members of parliament during the period 1613-15 and again in 1634. He is also credited with building part of Letterkenny town, and with the formation of the "Lagganeers" or Laggan army: this force were victorious at the battle of Glenmaquin, defeating Sir Phelim O?Neill in 1641. The Stewarts of Ramelton are buried in their family vault at Killydonnell Franciscan Friary, between Letterkenny and Ramelton.

 
 
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County Donegal, Ireland
County Donegal, Ireland
This is the Stewart Grotto behind the Killydonnell Friary. The Friary was founded in 1471 by the O'Donnells for the Franciscan Friars on the site of an older church erected by the O'Tonners. The bilding and lands were granted at the Planation, in 1603, to Captain Basil Brooke. 
 
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County Donegal, Ireland
County Donegal, Ireland
Lough Swilly behind the third old house at Ramelton. 
 
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County Donegal, Ireland
County Donegal, Ireland
The bridge at Ramelton.

See Stewart Caveat for rendering of the bridge around 1609 to 1622. 
 
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County Donegal,Ireland
County Donegal,Ireland
Ramelton 
 
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County Tyrone, Ireland
County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

Aughentaine Castle, in Aghintain Townland, was built in 1618 by Sir William Stewart. In 1622 it is was described as a large Castle of Lyme & Stone, strong & defencible...about it is a Bawne of lyme & stone, 211foot long, 112 foot broad & 10 foot high, with Flanckers". Only fragments of this 17th century fortified house remain. It was destroyed in 1641 and never rebuilt. The west wall stands to full height and there are some fireplaces at the higher levels. The building was three storeys high plus attic. The main block is aligned E-W and is about 17m by 10m externally.

A wing about 6m square projects from the middle of the north wall. In the angle between this wing and the W portion of the main building there is a fine Scottish-type corbel, with 12 courses of corbels. This carries the remains of a circular stairwell which rises from first floor level.


 
 
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County Tyrone, Ireland
County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

On the Mount-Stewart property Sir William Stewart built the great castle of Aughentaine, which was destroyed during the disturbances which broke out in 1641.  
 
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County Tyrone, Ireland
County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

On the Mount-Stewart property Sir William Stewart built the great castle of Aughentaine, which was destroyed during the disturbances which broke out in 1641.  
 
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Craig Roller Mill, Toby Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Craig Roller Mill, Toby Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Washington Adams Craig, Proprietor  
 
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Craig's Mill
Craig's Mill
Licking Creek, Clarion County, Pennsylvania 
 

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