Print Bookmark

Notes


Matches 551 to 593 of 593

      «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12

 #   Notes   Linked to 
551 Unless otherwise noted all information on the descendants of Elmer P. Wall was furnished by Linda Walls)

Notes for ELMER P. WALLS:
1900 census Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., PA: Elmer P. b. Aug 1864, 35, married 10 yrs, Elizabeth, wife, b. July 1869, 30, mother of 5, 5 living, Frank M. b. Dec 1891, 8, Mabel M. b. Nov 1893
1910 census Porter Twp., Clarion Co., PA: Elmer P. Walls 45, 1st marriage, married 20 years, Elizabeth, wife, 41, mother of 6, 6 living, Frank M. 18, Mabel M. 16, Clyde G. 14, Blanche B. 12, Effel P. 10, Raymond S. 6.
1920 census Porter twp., Clarion Co., PA: Elmer P. Walls 55, Elizabeth 51, Frank M. 28, Clyde G. 24, Blanch 22, Ethel 20, Raymond 16.

Was known to have a fine farm with the latest equipment. He built the first brick silo in the area. A photo exists of this construction.

Will dated January 29, 1937, recorded at Clarion County courthouse February 9, 1937, Elmer leaves his farm of about 131 acres to his son Frank M. Walls including livestock, machinery, etc., with the condition that Elmer's wife, Elizabeth "shall continue to live in our home or residence on the farm and shall be supported and maintained there according to her station in life the same as she has been accustomed during my lifetime including food, clothing, care in health and during sickness, with all ordinary expenses required by her, nursing and medical services and a repectable burrial after death the same as I would expect to provide for her if I were to survive her. My said wife shall during her life have equal and joint control with my son Frank M. Walls of the cattle and other livestock now belonging to me." The timber located on the northern part of the homestead was to be divided among the remaining 5 children: Mable Walls, Clyde G. Walls, Blanche Hoover, Ethel Ferguson, and Raymond Walls. Gas rentals received should be first used for payment of taxes on the farm. Clyde bought a tractor with his share of the timber money.

Obit: Elmer P. Walls died at his home at Rimersburg, R. D. 3, Saturday, January 30, 1937. Mr. Walls, the son of Morrison C. and Rebecca L. Walls, was born at New Athens, Pennsylvania, August 27, 1864. He was united in marriage to Miss Louella Stewart, December 25, 1889. To this union six children were born, namely: Frank M. Walls, at home; Clyde G. Walls, of New Bethlehem; Raymond S. Walls, Red Bank; Mrs. H. C. Ferguson of Lawsonham; Mrs B. W. Hoover, of New Bethlehem, and Mabel M. Walls, of Butler, all of whom with his wife, survive. He was preceded in death by his parents, one brother and one sister. The early years of his life were spent in the oil fields of Butler County. He returned to Clarion County in 1904 and here he spent the remainder of his life. Mr. Walls was a member of the Presbyterian Church for many years. Funeral services in his memory were conducted at the home, Tuesday, February 2, 1937 at two o'clock with the Reverend Wm. J. Organ and the Reverend R. E. Kiern officiating. Interment was made in the Rimersburg cemetery under the direction of C. B. Stewart. Card of Thanks: We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to our many friends for the kindness shown through the time of illness and death of our loving husband and father. Also for the beautiful flowers and the use of cars. Mrs. E. P. Walls and Children.

The day of his funeral was Groundhog Day and it was a bitter cold day. Yet, according to his grandson, Bill Walls, people came from everywhere and stood out in the bitter cold for his funeral. He remembers all the cars and the people in the yard of Elmer's home. There was not enough room inside the house for everyone.

(Above information furnished by Linda Walls)
 
Walls, Elmer P. (I0362)
 
552 Unless otherwise noted all information on the descendants of Rebecca Stewat and William Forbes was taken from "Frontier Families of Toby Township, Clarion Co., Pennsylvania" by Heber Rankin, Janice Yingling, Editor, Pittsburgh, Pa., May 1995.

Rebecca Stewart and William Forbes settled on 100 acres that Lieutenant William Stewart gave his daughter at Moravia (now Lawrence County), Pennsylvania. Both are buried in the Bethel Cemetery, New Castle, Pennsylvania. 
Stewart, Rebecca (I0112)
 
553 Unless otherwise noted all information on the first three generations of the descendants of George Stewart and Jane Nelson was taken from "A Family of Millers and Stewarts" by Dr. Robert F.Miller, St. Louis, Missouri, August, 1909. (Note to File - JP Rhein) Stewart, George (I0134)
 
554 Unless otherwise noted all of the information on the Hilliards was taken from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of January 5, 1998), Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150, USA and as furnished in a report prepared by Bruce F. Gray, 365 W Alta View Dr., Midvale, Utah 84047 which contains substantial additional information and source references. (Note to File - JP Rhein) Hilgert, Johann Franz (I3242)
 
555 Unless otherwise noted information on the descendants of William H. Milligan was furnished by Lois Bertram (Mrs. Ronald), 3108 Greenbrier Avenue, Farmington, NM.  Milligan, William H. (I1759)
 
556 Unless otherwise noted, all information and photos on the descendants of Isaac Bailliote were furnished by Jean Polliard Cannassa. Jean advises that a good portion of the work was done by others including, Lulu Stewart Polliard and Cheryl McDonald and that she was the compiler.

The information that Jean furnished includes extensive information on the first five generations of the descendants of Isaac.

Information on the descendants of Joseph Balliet, born 1783, grandson of Paulus Balliet, was furnished by Dan Stewart unless otherwise noted.

No living descendants are included.
(Note to File - JP Rhein)

From, "The Balliet, Balliett, Balliette, Balyeat, Bolyard, and Allied Families," by Stephen Clay, Published by Thos. J. Moran's Sons, Inc., Baton Rouge, La. 1968. Call No. RG 929.2 Bal Library of Congress #68-23012

pg 33
"Isaac Bailliote of Burbach had a son Jacob Baillet. This Jacob Baillet was the progenitor of the pioneer immigrants of the three known founders of the families in America - PAULUS, JOSEPH, and JOHANNES Balliet.

pg 32 and 33
" During the Religious Wars many of the Huguenot families were separated and individual members of a family would be taken in and protected by relatives and friends sympathetic to the Huguenot beliefs. One of these refugees was an Isaac Bailliote, who was a resident of Burbach as early as 1625, Burbach is a village about six miles from Schalbach, and before the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, it appears to have been, with neighboring villages, a part of the Sovereignty of Saarwerden, which had become an asylum for the Huguenot refugees, among whom were the Baillets. Local records at Saarwerden inform us that the Baillet family had settled there before the outbreak of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648), but because of the frightful conditions that prevailed were forced into exile, returning after the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 to Schalbach, where the family became firmly established.

The various homes of the Balliets, their relatives and friends, many of whom also later settled in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, lie in a small area between the River Saar and the Vosges Mountains, with boundaries between extreme points of over thirty miles, lying partly in Alsace and partly in Lorraine. Schalbach being located about thirty-five miles southeast of Metz, France and forty miles northeast of Nancy, France. This part of Alsace and Lorraine like all other sections of the old German, or more properly, Holy Roman Empire, was split up into numerous petty sovereignties. In 1700 the Empire was a loose confederation of some three hundred states and some fourteen small territories belonging to petty knights, who exercised a power and jurisdiction as absolute as that of a prince. The maps of this period were crude and unreliable and the boundaries of the numerous states or sovereignties constantly changed, making it impossible to determine in which state a particular village or town was located.

pg 29
"Pierre Durand, a Huguenot pastor was hanged at Montpellier Languedoc in 1732 for preaching the Gospel. He may have been a relative of Margaretha Durand, wife of Johan Nicholas Baillet (1680-1745).

To study for the ministry of the Reformed Church in those days of persecution was to 'qualify for the gallows'. The ministry became the vocation of martyrs. The gallows for the Reformed ministers, and the galleys for those who listened to them. To break the bones of Huguenots on the wheel, or cutting out his tongue before hanging or burning him was accounted a great service to the Roman Church.

The Huguenot families who lived on the Lorraine side of the border, in the villages of Finstingen, Helleringen, Schallback, Pistorf and Lixheim, among whom were the Baillets and their kin, had neither churches nor pastors of their own. They were visited by pastors of the 'Desert' as they called the caves, valleys, woods and old quarries in which they met and worshipped.

At the present time, located between Miallet and Anduze is a 'Museum of the Desert' with a unique collection of Huguenot momentos."

pg 30
"The fact is that for many years before and after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Germany and Switzerland had become the chief asylums of the Huguenot Refugees. For a time they lived in hope the French Kings would restore their religious freedom, and that they would be permitted to return to France. That hope never realized, they became gradually absorbed by the Germans and Swiss, among whom they had settled. Thousands lost their Huguenot identity when their names became Germanized or corrupted. This effacement was continued when they came to America in the great German and Swiss emigration between the years 1700 and the outbreak of the Revolutionary War." (see Laux's "Fusion of Races in Lehigh County" P of L.Co.H.S., V.6, p 3-11)

pg 34
"The surname Balliet is no doubt a corrupted form of the old French 'Baillet', meaning sorrel or light colored when the word is used in referring to a horse of that color."

"In the French tongue, Balliet, as the name is spelled in America, and Baillet as it is mostly written in France, has practically the same pronunciation, Ba-yea, and will account for some of the vagaries of its orthography in the early French and Alsatian-Lorraine records. (Association) with the Germans in Alsace and Lorraine eventually gave the name a German sound, the double 'l' losing its characteristic French sound and the name pronounced Ball-yet or Bal-yet at the present time in Alsace-Lorraine and in Pennsylvania.

Paulus, Joseph, and Johannes, the three immigrant pioneers signed their names Balliet, with a few exceptions when the Baliet spelling is found. The name in Pennsylvania has been firmly established as Balliet and has remained unchanged since the days of the pioneers. Some of the second and third generation of Joseph's line who migrated to Richland County, Ohio and what is now Preston County, West Virginia, adopted the spelling of Balyeat and Bolyard. In several instances, later generations have used Balliett or Balliette. One family in California has given the name an Irish touch, O'Balliet."

pg 35
"Dr. Louis B. Balliet, a great-great-grandson of Paulus, published a 28 page brochure in 1873, in which four pages were devoted to the 'Race of the Balyards' (claiming knights and archbishops as ancestors and even included a coat of arms). . . "It is quite safe to say that this claim is mythical. . . I am convinced that he was imposed upon by a genealogical and heraldic fakir at Vienna, where it was drawn up."


 
Bailliote, Isaac (I3843)
 
557 Unless otherwise noted, all information on the descendants of Lewis Hartman was furnished by Cynthia June Hartman. Hartman, Lewis (I4205)
 
558 Unless otherwise noted, information on Forguson Potter George and his family was furnished by Butch George. George, Forguson Potter (I3755)
 
559 Unless otherwise noted, substantially all of the information on the Delps came from (1) Becky Hoffmeister of Levittown, Pennsylvania (2) sites on RootsWeb World Connect, and (3) postings on the Clarion County Historical Society site at RootsWeb.com. (Note to File - J.P. Rhein) Delp, George (I2373)
 
560 V. AVONELL MCKINNEY BURNS CO-OWNED BUSINESSES ON WATTSBURG ROAD

V. Avonell McKinney Burns, 90, of Sligo, Clarion County, formerly of 8800 Wattsburg Road in Greene Township, died Monday, Nov. 6, 2000, at the Clarion Hospital after a brief illness. She was born in Sligo March 14, 1910, daughter of the late Captain and Velma Winklebeck McKinney. She resided in Erie from 1948 to 1999. She and her late husband owned the Burns Service Station, the Burns Mobile Home Park and a dairy bar on Wattsburg Road. She also worked as a telephone operator at the New Bethlehem Telephone Co. She was a member of Prince of Peace Lutheran Church and enjoyed traveling and crocheting. Her husband, Francis S. Burns, preceded her in death in 1974. Also preceding her in death were two brothers, James and Arthur McKinney. Survivors include a daughter, Maxine Lerch Hartle and her husband, Harold, of Sligo; three grandchildren, Arthur and Michael Lerch and Stephane McFee; seven great-grandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Russell C. Schmidt & Son Funeral Home, 2926 Pine Ave., Wednesday from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. A service will be held there Thursday at 11 a.m., with the Rev. J. Kenneth Laber of Prince of Peace Lutheran church officiating. Burial will be at Wintergreen Gorge Cemetery. Erie Times-News (PA) - November 6, 2000

Pamela Myers-Grewell
has2laff@hotmail.com  
McKinney, Velma Avonell (I2695)
 
561 Vesta Florence McKinney died February 18, 1982
Clarion Hospital 64 yrs
Born - Murphy's Borough, Illinois.
Burial 02-21-1982 Sligo

Preceded in death by a brother, Logan Overturff DOB. August 20, 1917

She was the daughter of Collie and Mae Overturff. She married Arthur W. McKinney on December 12, 1934.

Survivors

1 daughter, Velma Moggey 1 son, Richard McKinney 1 sister, Betty Marshall 1 granddaughter, Michelle Lyn

Burial Cemetery Lot Section Undertaker
02-21-1982 Sligo Cleo A. Hawk

Source - Eccles Memorial Library, Burial Database, Rimersburg, Clarion County, Pennsylvania)



 
Overturff, Vesta Florence (I1443)
 
562 W. Gordon McNutt, one of the most worthy citizens of Clarion County, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. C. Decker, who lives on Greenville Avenue extension, Clarion, on Wednesday, March 13, 1929, at the age of 69 years, 2 months and 15 days, his death following a brief illness from heart trouble. Mr. McNutt was born at Worthville on December 18, 1859. With his parents he went to Porter Township when quite young and spent almost his entire life near Leatherwood in that township, removing to Clarion only five years ago. He was married to Miss Sara Jack, of Porter Township, on May 13, 1879. Mrs. McNutt died a number of years ago, but he is survived by the following: S. Byron McNutt of New Kensington; James J. McNutt of Parnassus, Edwin V. McNutt, Harold N. McNutt, Mrs. Carrie Fowkes, Mrs. Ethel Decker and Mrs. Ruth McMasters of Clarion, and William G. McNutt of Porter township. He is also survived by one brother, John McNutt, of Gary, Ind., a half-brother, Dr. Newcome, of Chickasaw, a half-sister, Mrs. Ida Pickens, of Canfield, 0.; who with her husband attended the funeral. Twenty seven grandchildren also survive. A brief funeral service was conducted at his late home in Clarion by his pastor, Rev. R. E. Keirn, at 8:00 Saturday morning, and the body was then taken to the Leatherwood church, where services were held, after which the body was laid to rest beside that of his wife at that place.. Democrat, Clarion, Pa. March 21, 1929 McNutt, William Gordon (I1698)
 
563 War of 1812 Service Records
Name: David McKibben
COMPANY: 1 REG'T (FERREE'S) PENNSLYVANIA MILITIA.
Rank - Induction: PRIVATE
Rank - Discharge: PRIVATE
Roll Box: 140
Roll Exct: 602

The above entry will need to be checked as to whether the reference is to David McKibben born July 25, 1779 or David McKibben born December 31, 1782. Pending verification I Have referenced the War of 1812 information to both individuals who were residents of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania at that time. (Note to File - JP Rhein)

 
McKibben, David (I3107)
 
564 Was a member of Captain W. E. Allen's Company, 155th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Enrolled on the 10th of August 1862 to serve three years.
Discharged 2 June 1865.

Was a prisoner of war intered at Andersonville, Georgia. Had a cane that he carved while a Prisoner of War.

"Andersonville is a village in Sumter county, southwest-central Georgia, U.S., that was the site of a Confederate military prison from February 1864 until May 1865 during the American Civil War. Andersonville—formally, Camp Sumter—was the South’s largest prison for captured Union soldiers and was notorious for its unhealthy conditions and high death rate. The site of the camp has been preserved as Andersonville National Historic Site. The village, which is approximately one-quarter mile (0.4 km) from the camp, includes the railroad depot at which the prisoners arrived and the prison warden’s office. Other attractions include a 7-acre (2.8-hectare) farm dating from the mid-19th century.

In the summer of 1863 the U.S. federal authorities ended an agreement under which Union and Confederate captives were exchanged; the resultant increased number of Union prisoners of war confined in the capital city of Richmond, Va., constituted a danger to the Confederacy and put serious pressure on that city’s food supply. In November 1863, Confederate authorities selected Andersonville, through which ran a stream, as the site for a stockade encompassing 16.5 acres (6.7 hectares). Prisoners began to arrive in February 1864, before the prison was completed and before adequate supplies had been received, and by May their number amounted to about 12,000. In June the stockade was enlarged to 26 acres (10.5 hectares), but the congestion was only temporarily relieved, and by August the number of prisoners exceeded 32,000.

No shelter had been provided for the inmates: the first arrivals made rude sheds from the debris of the stockade; the others made tents of blankets and other available pieces of cloth or dug pits in the ground. By that time the resources of the Confederacy were stretched thin, and the prison was frequently short of food. Even when food was sufficient in quantity, it was of poor quality and was poorly prepared because of the lack of cooking utensils. The water supply, deemed ample when the prison was planned, became polluted under the congested conditions, and the medical staff was inadequate and poorly provisioned. During the summer of 1864 the prisoners suffered greatly from hunger, exposure, and disease, and in seven months about one-third of them died. In the autumn of 1864, after William Tecumseh Sherman’s Union forces had captured Atlanta, all the prisoners who could be moved were sent to Millen, Ga., and Florence, S.C. Arrangements at Millen were better, and, when Sherman began his March to the Sea, some 5,000 prisoners were returned to Andersonville, where the conditions also were somewhat improved. In all, nearly 13,000 Union prisoners died at Andersonville from disease, malnutrition, and other causes.

Conditions in Andersonville were utilized as propaganda material in the North, where Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton ordered retaliation on Confederates held in Union prisons. After the war, Capt. Henry Wirz, commander of the prison, was tried and convicted of war crimes by a military commission. Wirz rejected an offer of parole in exchange for his incrimination of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, and he was hanged on Nov. 10, 1865. He is the only person in the United States ever to have been executed for war crimes." (Source - Encyclopedia Britannica) 
Hartman, Lewis (I4205)
 
565 Was a widower, passing part of his time in Bradford, Pennsylvania and the remainder in Ohio with a daughter and a son. Hilliard, Frederick (I3254)
 
566 Was at Glasgow University in 1513. He appears to have been guilty of the slaughter of William Stirling of Glorat in 1534. He is called "Tutor of Culcreuch". Galbraith, Humphrey (I4267)
 
567 Was stillborn. Stewart, Bermie (I3975)
 
568 When James and his wife went to Ireland from Scotland is not known but before October 17,1761, the date of birth of son, William. (Note to File –JP Rhein)
 
Craig, James (I4143)
 
569 When Thomas Stewart became of age he bought a tract of government land of 140 acres in Toby Township, paying the sum of $1.00 an acre. This land was entirely covered with timber which was gradually cleared off. The farm is now (1963) owned by David Allen Stewart, a great grandson of Thomas. Thomas and Susanna Lauffer attended the Presbyterian Church at Concord in Perry Township and both of them are buried in the lower cemetery. After Susanna's death in 1864, Thomas married Barbara Jemima Miller who had been married to Mr. Clark. Jemima Clark Stewart lived to be 92 years old.

The will of Thomas Stewart, probated November 1, 1881, was in the possession of Mrs. (Lydia) Glenn Slaugenhaup of Sligo, Clarion County, Pennsylvania on July 20, 1959.

(Source - Frontier Families of Toby Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania by Heber Rankin, Janice Yingling, Editor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 1995)

Thomas Stewart was a blacksmith by trade. He was a very large man, weighing 225 pounds. He was elected Associate Judge of Clarion County in the early 1860's. (Source - P. Synder, 1912)

The will of Thomas Stewart, probated 11/l/1881, was in the possession of Mrs. (Lydia) Glenn Slaugenhaupt of Sligo,Clarion County, Pennsylvania, when copied by Heber Rankin on July 20, 1959.

THE WILL OF STEWART

"In the name of God, Amen.

I,Thomas Stewart, of the township of Toby, County of Clarion, State of Pennsylvania, being in usual sound health of body and of sound and disposing mind and memory do make and publish this my last will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.

As to such estate as it hath pleased God to intrust me with, I dispose of the same as follows, to wit:
I direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon after my decease as practicable.
I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Jemima Stewart, three hundred and fifty dollars in cash, also fifty dollars annually in produce and fifteen bushels annually of green apples all of which is to be delivered on the farm on which I now reside during har n:afi irol lif-, also one choice cow, also one average hog fattened yearly, also all my household and kitchen furniture to be hers absolute.

My three sons, William Stewart, Loffer Stewart, and Reuben Stewart, having been advanced by me all I think they are entitled to of my estate, I give and bequeath to them each one dollar only.
I give and bequeath to my two daughters, Sarah Summerville and Susan Hartman, four hundred dollars each, due one half in one year and one half in two years after my decease.
I order and direct that my son Allen Stewart pay to my said wife, Jemima Stewart and my two daughters, Sarah Summerville and Susan Hartman, their bequests herein before mentioned.

I give and devise to my son Allen Stewart all my farm and mansion house and buildings thereon erected situated in the Township County and State aforesaid containing about one hundred and forth acres of land, be the same more or less. Binding my said son, Allen Stewart, hereby to deliver to me in the barn on the premises one third of all grain and potatoes raised on said farm during the term of my natural life to be delivered in the bushel. Also my said son to pay all taxes and furnish pasture for my stock. After all my debts and expenses of seftling my estate are fully satisfied, I give and bequeath to my son, Allen Stewart, aforesaid all the rest residue and remainder of my personal estate of whatsoever kind.

I hereby consitute and appoint my son Loffer Stewart sole executor of this my last will and testament. In witness whereof 1, Thomas Stewart, the testator have to this my will set my hand and seal this 30 day of July A. D. 1881."

Thomas Stewart 
Stewart, Thomas II (I0136)
 
570 Wilbur's Switch— To reach its decision, the Senators took much testimony. Robert Giffen Stewart, president of Standard Oil of Indiana's big subsidiary, Pan American Petroleum & Transport Co. was dead against any tariff, as well he might be since his company is one of the biggest importers of gasoline. Senator Tydings of Maryland was also opposed. He said a tariff would cost the U. S. people "at least $980,000,000 a year." Senator Tydings probably also had in mind the fact that when an experimental shipment of Soviet oil was lately made to the U. S. it arrived in Maryland's Baltimore, that Baltimore may hope to become a big oil port. (Source - Time Magazine, February 16, 1931)  Stewart, Robert Giffen (I1335)
 
571 WILL OF ANDREW GALBRAITH (Sr.)
Page 231
Dated: November 17, 1857
Proven: Dec. Term. 1860

In the Name of God, Amen, November 17, 1857 I Andrew Galbraith, Sr. of the County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee, being of sound mind and memory but calling to mind that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following: I give my soul to God who created and gave it, my body to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my Executors, and lastly, my earthly estate in the manner following. I will that all my just debts be paid. I give to my daughter Louisa McCanse the sum of $5.00, in addition to what she has heretofore received at the time of her marriage. I give to my son Alexander M. Galbraith the sum of $200.00, in addition to what he has heretofore received. To my son John M. Galbraith the sum of $5.00 in additon to what he has heretofore received. To my daughter Anna Maria Galbraith one feather bed and furniture and one half of the proceeds of a plantation sold to Nelson Getser in July or August, 1853, it being the farm on which said Getser now lives, containing 300 acres more or less which was sold for $5.00 per acre, that the proceeds and interest arising thereon be managed and controled by my Executors for her benefit and support as I deem her incompetent to manage her own property. The proceeds and interest of the other half I will and bequeath to the heirs of my daughter Elizabeth Lee, dec'd. I give to my daughter Sarah Elmore my negro boy Page and girl Laura, also one equal divide of any other children my girl Harriet may have previous to my death not othewise disposed of by this will. I also give her my young gray horse Bob, which horse is given in trust for the benefit of her son William Porter Elmore. I give to my daughter Amanda McCarty my girl Harriet and her sons Orange and Wesley and an equal divide with Sarah Elmore of any other children Harriet may have as above provided. If I do not in my lifetime make any arrangements for my daughter Amanda a home, my Executors are hereby authorized to invest $800.00 out of any monies belonging to my estate in the lands where she lives for the benefit of her and her children. To my sons Joseph and Andrew I give the farm on which I live (except the marble quarry) containing 700 acres more or less by them paying to my son Anderson $1,000.00, and to the son and daughter of Audley Galbraith, dec'd $2,000.00, an to my son William $500.00 with interest on these sums from one year after my death till paid. They may have indulgence if they desire it on the money to be paid the son & daughter of Audley Galbraith, dec'd, until they are of age, by paying the interest. It is my will in further relation to the part of the farm given to my son Andrew, that should he have no children at his death that it revert back to my other children or their heirs. I give to my son Andrew my waggons and gears, also the farming tools, one feather bed and furniture, my negro girl Sarah, my desk and book case and rifle gun. My son Andrew is to have the part of the farm where I now live, and Joseph the other part where he lives, dividing by the lane that now leads to the bottom. The lands up the river to be divided between them giving each necessary ways to ofrom his lots, this relates to the lands above the Big Spring branch. The money to be paid Frederick A. Galbraith and Mary T. Galbraith, children of Audley Galbraith, dec'd., to be equally divided, share and share alike. The marble quarry on the home place to contain fifty acres more or less, embracing all the marble land on the potato hill, I give in equal interest to all my children and their heirs including both families. The proceeds and profits arising therefrom after my decease to be equally divided amongst all my children or their heirs. Joseph and Andrew to have the benefit of the rents of any houses on the quarry lands during the present lease, and the proceeds of wood sold during said leases to be equally divided between Joseph, Anderson and Andrew.. It is further provided that none of the quarry property shall be sold off in lots or shares, but if ever sold, to be sold altogether and proceeds equally divided between beneficiaries--not to be sold for a less sum than $50,000.00. It is my will that my son Andrew have my negro boy Kader. I give to Sarah Elmore my Clarks commentary on the New Testament. To Anderson Galbraith my History of the Methodist Church. To Wm. Galbraith Watson's Institutes. To Joseph Galbraith, Fletcher's Checks. To Andrew Galbraith my Family Bible. To William and Harvey Galbraith Benson's Commentary. To Amanda McCarty my life of Bascom, Bascom's Sermons, Life of Lady Maxwell and Benson's Sermons. The balance of my books to be divided amongst my heirs by my Executors. My household furniture or other property not disposed of to be sold and anything remaining after paying the bequests herein provided for, the balance to be divided amongst all my children. I appoint my three sons, Joseph, William and Andrew Executors of this my last Will and Tesament. In testimony of all and every part herein contained, revoking all others, I have hereunto signed my proper name and affixed my seal the day and date first above written.
A. Galbraith (seal)
Signed, sealed & acknowledged Say A. Galbraith, Sr. in presence of : W. H. Moffett A. Blackburn J.T. Moffett
August 12, 1860, the foregoing will reviewed and approved in all its parts. Witness: James L. Etter, C.C. Etter, William W. Etter, Junior 
Galbraith, Andrew (I9864)
 
572 WILL OF ARTHUR GALBRAITH

I Arthur Galbraith of the County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee, being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind the mortality of my body that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make, ordain, publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament in manner and form following:

First and principally of all. I give my soul into care of Almight God who created and gave it. Second. My body to the Earth to be buried in a decent and Christian like manner at the discretion of my Executors. And Third and lastly. My Earthly Estate wherewith I may die seized or possessed I give and bequeath in manner following:

First, I allow all my just debts to be paid. Second. I will to my son John Galbraith my negro boy Albert and my negro girl Araminto and $200.00 in money, also my old servant negro man Aaron, the said negro having been a faithful servant and it is his wish to reside with my said son John.

Third. I will to my daughter Elizabeth Armstrong my negro boy Mitchell.

Forthly. I will to my son Andrew Galbraith the sum of ten dollars which I consider his part having heretofore provided for him.

Fifthy. I will to my son Aeneas S. Galbraith my negro woman Minna and her youngest child Nancy to my grand daughter Elizabeth Galbraith, daughter of my son Aeneas.

Sixthly. I will that all my stock of every kind, household furniture, farming utensils and money on hand and every kind of property not heretofore disposed of to be sold and the money arising therefrom to be equally divided among my herein after named children, share and share alike (To wit): My daughter Margaret Young, Elizabeth Armstrong, Polly Looney, Sally Young, Julia Davis, Tabetha Henderson and Lucinda Carrington.

Forthly and Lastly. I constitute and appoint my two sons John Galbraith and Aeneas S. Galbraith Executors of this my last will and Testament. The foregoing I publish and declare to be my last Will and Testament, revoking all others. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seals This 23rd day of February, 1818.
Arthur x Galbraith (seal) (his mark)
Signed, sealed, published and declared in presence of: James Amis, Jurat Henry Brown, Sen'r,Jurat Henry Brown

________________________________________
Will of Arthur Galbraith, dated 23 February l8l8, recorded in Will Book I, page 210, Hawkins County, Tennessee. This copy is made from the original will in File Box "G", in the Office of the County Court Clerk; Rogersville TN 24 November 1958
Obtained by Member Loree Gilbreath Miller



 
Galbraith, Arthur (I0347)
 
573 Will of Ezekiel Stewart

Ezekiel Stewart's will dated June 21, 1734, mentions his sons, William, Charles, Michael and Annesley. In papers in possession of the Baronet, it is stated that Ezekiel's will named four sons and referred to his brothers, Robert and Alexander. (Note to File - J.P. Rhein)

"Ezekiel Stewart, baptized Apr. 81 1698, in Londonderry, was, it might be assumed, the eldest boy in the family to grow up, because we never hear of the brother Thomas, who was baptized on Apr. 12, 1697. But we shouldn't be too sure. Ezekiel was named for his grandfather, Rev. Ezekiel Hopkins, the sly old bishop of Londonderry who tried to play into the hands of King James II at the beginning of the siege, and Grampa may have put flowers in the pathway of his namesake, making the brothers look like black sheep. Since the father, Col. "Buda Will" Stewart of Fort Stewart, seems to have relinquished his title to the property to the head of the Mountjoy family, Ezekiel and his brothers may have had to start their fortunes from scratch. The parliament of Ireland passed a bill of attainder against William Stewart, the first Viscount Mountjoy, while he was confined in the Bastille in France. and "the Irish army burned and destroyed the castle of Newtown-Stewart and all the furniture therein, also the town of Newtown Stewart and the castle and town of Ramelton, and wasted all of the family estate." This was recounted by Lord Mountjoy's son, William Stewart, in a petition Apr. 8, 1696, to King William's government for the restoration of the family's honors and estates. The system of land ownership was gradually changing from the concept of herd, or tribal possession, as personified by a head man, or king,' to the concept of individual proprietorship, that every man's house was his castle. The parliament passes successive land purchase acts, which resulted in the dividing up of large land holdings among the common people - and making common people out of the scions of aristocracy.

Ezekiel married, about 1717, Anne Ward, daughter of the Rev. Dr. Charles Ward of Mount Panther, County Down, and sister of Rev. Bernard Ward. He lived at Fort Stewart, County Donegal, where he died in 1734. He made his will June 11, 1734, and it was probated Oct. 17, that year. "He devised his estate, in failure of heirs male of his own sons to his brothers Robert and Alexander and their issue, remaindur (unused title) to William Stewart, Viscount Mountjoy and the Honorable James Stewart, successively in tail male; remainder to his own daughters". That meant that the line of the eldest son really " owned" the lands: the others were merely lifetime occupants. Ezekiel's widow Anne visited at the home of Rev, Archibald Stewart, rector of Ballintoy parish, in County Antrim, when a child was born to the rector. This brings up a question of relationship between the two Stewart families, although the association probably came about through church affiliation. Archibald Stewart and his wife, a daughter of Robert Vesey, bishop of Tuam, had been married nearly 20 years before a baby was born to them, as recounted by Samuel Stone. in his manuscript, "Being solicitous to strengthen the constitution of this only child of their old age, they had him bathed in a large vessel of cold water for several mornings . Mrs. Stewart, the widow of Mr. Ezekiel Stewart of Fort Stewart, being at Ballintoy, undertook the office of bathing the child, and having dipped him two or three times into the water without sufficient intermission for him to recover his breath, she wrapped him in a blanket and carried him to the nursery. When the blanket was opened he was found to be dead, to the astonishment and grief of the family." (Source - Stewart Clan Magazine, Tome I, Volume 37, February 1960) 
Stewart, Ezekiel (I0210)
 
574 WILL OF JOHN GALBRAITH

In the Name of God, Amen. I, John Galbraith of the County of Hawkins & State of Tennessee, being of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind the imortality of my body, that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make, ordain, publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament in manner and form following. First and principally of all, I give my soul into care of Almighty God who created and gave it. Second. My body to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like manner at the discretion of my hereinafter named Executors, and Third and lastly, I give my Earthly estate wherewith I may die seized or possessed of in manner following:

First. I allow all my just debts to be paid.
Second. I give to my son Andrew L. Galbraith $1,000.00 in money.
Third. I give to my daughter Priscilla Wright a negro girl named Araminta which I consider worth $200.00, also three notes of hand given by her husband Robert Wright for $308.00, making in all the sum of $508.00, which sum is to be counted in her dower as part of my estate without interest hereinafter named. I also give her
one cow and calf of my stock and one bed and furniture.
Fourth. To my daughter Sally Watterson I give one bed & furniture over and above what she has heretofore received.
Fifth. To my son John Sharp Galbraith two horse beasts, to wit: One brown horse called his horse & one sorrel mare, a new three horse waggon and $700.00 in money, also two beds and one bed stead and furniture.
Sixth. To my daughter Juliann I give one hundred dollars in money, one horse, two beds & furniture.
Seventh. To my son Arthur Wright Galbraith I give my large Family Bible, $1,100.00 in money, a negro boy named Spencer, a mare and young horse, two beds and furniture, provided he goes to the State of Missouri and settles and remains there, but in case he does not go to said State of Missouri, or if said state should not agree with him and he may return and prefer living elsewhere, in that case I will that he have the tract of land I now live on in Stanley Valley containing 178 acres, also an entry of 50 acres, making in all 228 acres, more or less. The negro boy above named, Book, horses & Beds.
The rest of my books I wish equally divided with all my children except Arthur W. Galbraith, and my hereinafter named Executors to make s'd division.
I will that all my negroes, together with all my stock of every kind, household furniture & farming tools and every kind of property not herein already disposed of be sold and the proceeds of the sale & money on hand be equally divided among my herinafter named children, share and share alike (to wit) Priscilla Wright, Matilda Haygood, Sally Watterson, Melinda Sprowl & Juliann Galbraith.
Lastly. I consititute and appoint my son Andrew Galbraith & brother Aeneas S. Galbreath Executors of this my last Will & Testament. The foregoing I declare to be my last Will and Testament, disannulling & revoking all others. In testimony I hereunto set my hand and affix my seal, This 22nd day of August, 1832.
John Galbraith (seal)
Signed in presence of: H. Watterson, Elijah C. Gillenwaters Absolom D. Looney
Page 219
Dated: August 22, 1832

 
Galbraith, John (I9861)
 
575 Will states, among other things, the following: "...share and share alike between my step children and my beloved wife Elisabeth step children to with Catherine Stanford, Mary Bish, Nicholas Delp, Catherine Bussard, Elizabeth Cousson, Polly Swabe and Henry Delp..." then more children are listed. "...until my youngest child to the age of twenty one...and my will is that after my daughter Lena is of age that all my real estate be sold and the proceeds therefrom be divided share and share alike between my daughter Susan and daughter Sarah and John Guir Delph and my daughter Joan and my daughter Marthalena..."

"John Guierre Delph is the only individual in the Delp line with the spelling 'Delph'. In his father's will he is again referred to as 'John Guir Delph' I believe his mother, Elizabeth Guyer, may have (1) come from a family with a French name that was changed to Guyer, or (2) been married prior to her marriage to Lewis Delp and that her name was Guierre. Delp in French is Delph. (Note to File - J.P. Rhein) 
Delp, Lewis Guy (I2371)
 
576 William continued his father's fulling mill as late as 1783. (Source - Frontier Families of Toby Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, Stewart, page 2)

"To be rented, or let on Shares, a Fulling Mill, with about 10 acres of good land, on the Falling Spring, within a mile and a half of Chambersburg. William Gass" (Source- The Franklin Repository, November 10, 1803) 
Gass, William (I0215)
 
577 William Milligan, et al and John Milligan, bought from William Phetty 109 acres 156 perches located in Redbank Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania on March 8, 1828. (Source - Book AB1, pp 422, Clarion County Courthouse, Pennsylvania)

Deed shows that John Milligan and William Milligan of the City of Philadelphia bought land in Redbank Township and County of Armstrong for $360.00. (Land now located in Porter Township, Clarion County. Clarion County was formed from Venango and Armstrong Counties in 1840. Were William and John brothers?

Deed Book 1, pp 216 Agreement on September 23, 1841 - William Milligan to pay John Milligan $70.00 as soon as possible and land to be divided between them both.

Will of William Milligan Sr. of the Township of Porter in the County of Clarion. " I give and bequeath unto my second son William Milligan his heirs, etc., all property and personal property laying in Porter Township. This day January 2, 1855. Appointed Michael Jack sole Executor. Witnesses William Divins and Joseph McKinney. (Source - Will Docket A pp/160 Clarion County Courthouse. Recorded at courthouse May 8, 1855)

Will refers to William Milligan as second son, whereas Family Group Sheet shows William as the first son. (Note to file by Joseph Philip Rhein)

Clarion Courthouse Deed Book 31, pp329. grantee John Milligan, grantor William Milligan by heirs 62 acres, 32 perches in Porter Townshipon February 14, 1882. ... and John Milligan who buys the land located in Porter Townsip for $1.00. Land borders the lot of the Baptist church. (William Milligan is desceased - land is awarded to John Milligan) 
Milligan, William (I0084)
 
578 William Stewart II left the farm to his son, Robert Stewart, who was born in 1807 on the family farm. Robert married Sara McCall. Their son Robert Stewart, born in 1830 and married Catherine Peters, inherited the family farm. When Robert died in 1902 he willed the farm to his son, Wilbur Wallace Stewart, born 1870 on the family farm, with the provision that Wilbur's mother, Catherine Peters Stewart, would have a home there as long as she lived. She died in 1912. On Wilbur's death in 1946, the family farm was willed to his daughter Martha Elseta Stewart, born 1900, married to William Owens. (Source - "A Heritage, Biography and Family History of Harold W. Stewart" by Norma M. Stewart) Stewart, Robert (I0501)
 
579 William Stewart left the farm to his son, Robert Stewart, who was born in 1807 on the family farm. Robert married Sara McCall. Their son Robert Stewart, born in 1830 and married Catherine Peters, inherited the family farm. When Robert died in 1902 he willed the farm to his son, Wilbur Wallace Stewart, born 1870 on the family farm, with the provision that Wilbur's mother, Catherine Peters Stewart, would have a home there as long as she lived. She died in 1912. On Wilbur's death in 1946, the family farm was willed to his daughter Martha Elseta Stewart, born 1900, married to William Owens.  Stewart, Martha Elseta (I2012)
 
580 William Stewart left the farm to his son, Robert Stewart, who was born in 1807 on the family farm. Robert married Sara McCall. Their son Robert Stewart, born in 1830 and married Catherine Peters, inherited the family farm. When Robert died in 1902 he willed the farm to his son, Wilbur Wallace Stewart, born 1870 on the family farm, with the provision that Wilbur's mother, Catherine Peters Stewart, would have a home there as long as she lived. She died in 1912. On Wilbur's death in 1946, the family farm was willed to his daughter Martha Elseta Stewart, born 1900, married to William Owens. (Source - "A Heritage, Biography and Family History of Harold W. Stewart" by Norma M. Stewart) Stewart, Robert II (I0144)
 
581 William Stewart, a Representative from Pennsylvania; born in Mercer, Mercer County, Pa., September 10, 1810; attended the public schools; was graduated from Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pa.; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Mercer, Pa.; member of the State senate; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of War (Thirty-sixth Congress); resumed the practice of law; died in Mercer, Pa., on October 17, 1876; interment in Mercer Cemetery.
 
Stewart, William (I0821)
 
582 William Stewart, born about 1618, was devised the Rathmelton and Fawnet estates in County Donegal by his father's will. He was a soldier with his brother Alexander in 1649 when the latter had Sir Charles Coote cooped up in the city of Londonderry. He was captured in April, 1649, by the defenders in a sortie from the city, and when he tried to escape from captivity in October, that year, he was put to death. As his elder brother Alexander was then living it seems that John's share in the Stewart estate reverted to him as holder of the baronetcy. This would not preclude John's having a wife and children in County Donegal. (Source - Stewart Clan Magazine, Tome H, Volume 57, Number 6, December 1959)
 
Stewart, John (I1985)
 
583 William Stewart, born about 1626, has not been delineated in the Stewart family, more to say that he nevered married. That may not be true. He was named in his father's will, and probably got a farm in County Tyrone. The old baronet owned scads of farms, most of which he bought from time to time from owners whose families did not like the rowdy habits of neighbors. Socially it was regarded as 'provincial' to live anywhere else than London. (Source - Stewart Clan Magazine, Tome H, Volume 57, Number 6, December 1959) Stewart, William (I1986)
 
584 William's last will dated August 5, 1882 was registered February 16, 1893 at Clarion County courthouse. He left his farm of about 128 acres to his son William along with all the farming utensils. Said son William is to have a decent monument placed on his grave. His daughter Roselinda is to have the farm that she lived on providing she pay to the other heirs "not yet mentioned" $600. She is also to have all the household and kitchen furniture. The rest of his personal property, money, grain, or hay he left to his remaining four sons, David, Alexander, Robert and Amos. Amos and William were appointed executors.

Last Will and Testament of William Stewart

In the name of God amen, I, William Stewart, farmer, of the township of Perry, in the county of Clarion and State of Pennsylvania, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty two being weak in body yet of sound mind and memory and understanding, praise be to God for it and considering the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof and to the end I may be better prepared to leave this world whenever it shall please God to call me hence, I do therefore make and declare this to be my last will and testament in the following manner revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made first and principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God my Creator who gave it and my body to the earth to be decently buried in the graveyard at East Concord church and as to my worldly estate where with it has pleased God to entrust me with I do dispose of in the following manner.
Firstly, I order that all my just debts and funeral expenses be first and fully paid and satisfied out of my personal property or money by my executor and hereafter named as soon after my decease as by him found convenient.
Item 1. I give and bequeath to my son William all my rights, title, interest and claim of the farm on which I now reside, including about one hundred and twenty eight acres more or less. It is also my desire that my son William is to have all my farming utensils. It is also my will that my son William is to have a decent monument put up as soon after my death as possible.
2. It is also my will that my daughter Roselinda is to have all my rights, title, interest and claim of the farm that she now resides upon owing as per large farm by paying six hundred dollars for the use of the heirs not yet mentioned. It is also my desire that my daughter Rosalinda is to have all my household and kitchen furniture.
3. It is also my will to give all the rest and residue of personal property or money or grain or hay in the barn to my four sons namely, David, Alexander, Robert and Amos to be divided between them share and share alike.
And lastly I do nominate and appoint my two sons Amos and William Stewart of Perry Township to be the Executors of this my last will and testament. In testimony whereof I the said William Stewart have to this my last will and testament contained on one sheet of paper have subscribed my name and affix my seal August 5 AD 1882
William X Stewart
Mark
Signed, sealed and published and declared by the said William Stewart as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at this request and in the presence of each other have published our names as witnesses thereto.
David A. Weter
Alexander McCall
Clarion County, so:
Before me W. N. Nerckman (sp?). Register for the Probate of Wills and granting letters of administration in and for the county of Clarion personally came David A. Weeter one of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing will who being duly sworn according to law says that he was present and saw and heard William Stewart, deceased, the Testator therein named sign make his mark to seal, publish, pronounce and declare the foregoing instrument of writing as and for his last will and testament and at the time of so doing he was of sound mind, memory and understanding to the best of his knowledge and belief.
Sworn and subscribed before me this 16th day of February AD 1893
W. N. Nerckman, Register
Registers office Feb'y 16th 1893
Clarion County, so:
This day before me W. N. Nerckman, register of wills and granting letters of administration in and for the county aforesaid personally came O. E. Nail and J. W. Long of the Borough of Clarion, County aforesaid who being duly sworn according to law say that they were well acquainted with the handwriting and signature of the said Alexander McCall and that the signature of the said Alexander McCall as subscribing witness to the last will and testament of William Stewart late of Perry Township, deceased, dated August 2nd 1882 is in the own proper handwriting and the genuine signature of the said Alexander McCall and that the said Alexander McCall has since died.
O. E. Nail
J. W. Long
Sworn and subscribed before me this 16th day of Feb'y 1893. W. N. Nerchman, Register
Registered February 16th 1893

(Above information furnished by Linda Walls)

 
Stewart, William III (I0006)
 
585 William, Born August 31, 1826 -- died March 28, 1920. Son of James & Mary C. (Crowell) Ditty) was born at Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania,
He was educated in the district schools of Porter township, and after reaching years of maturity turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He
owned a farm of six acres in Rimersburg, and had conducted the same for a period of forty-seven years. He was an ardent Democrat in political
convictions, and in the local councils of that party he was an active factor. For five years he was constable in Porter and Toby townships, and
for six years he served as constable in Rimersburg. He also served as a justice of the peace at Rimersburg. In their religious faith he and his wife were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

In 1854 he married Nancy Jane Mohney - (born - June 8, 1830 - died - Sept 17, 1910). She was a native of Porter township, Clarion County,
Pennsylvania. (Source - Roots Web, Mailing List, 'Ditty'.) 
Ditty, William M. (I4036)
 
586 Work Projects Administration, compiler, "WPA-Work Projects Administration 1930's Grave Registration Survey," database, WPA-Work Projects Administration 1930's Grave Registration Survey (http://iowawpagraves.org : viewed 1 May 2009), Elizabeth Haynes. Emerick, Elizabeth (I1564)
 
587 Work Projects Administration, compiler, "WPA-Work Projects Administration 1930's Grave Registration Survey," database, WPA-Work Projects Administration 1930's Grave Registration Survey (http://iowawpagraves.org : viewed 1 May 2009), Elizabeth Haynes. Emerick, Elizabeth (I1564)
 
588 Zion Lutheran (Klinger's) Church, Upper Paxton (now Lykens) Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania
 
Emerick, Alexander (I1563)
 
589 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 2, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from M through Z, Date of Import: Mar 28, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.112.4.54022.178]

Individual: Rhein, Aloysius
Birth date: Feb 1, 1900
Death date: Jun 1978
Social Security #: 190-05-3152
Last residence: PA 15201
State of issue: PA 
Rhein, Aloysius Ralph (I3137)
 
590 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 2, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from M through Z, Date of Import: Mar 28, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.112.4.54024.152]

Individual: Rhein, Stella
Birth date: Mar 6, 1907
Death date: Aug 1980
Social Security #: 167-07-1381
Last residence: PA 15201
State of issue: PA
Zip of last payment: 15224

In the 1930 Federal Census for Pennsylvania Stella Ritzel is residing with her sister, Anna and her husband Fred W. Lang in Oswego Street in the 27th Ward of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Also residing in the household are her brothers Edward H. and Richard T. Stella's occupation is listed as sales lady in grocery store. 
Ritzel, Stella L. (I3139)
 
591 [Brøderbund Family Archive #285, Ed. 1, Census Index: Western PA, PENNSYLVANIA CENSUS (WEST), Clarion County, 1870, Date of Import: May 16, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.285.1.10079.16]

Individual: Stewart, William
Race: W
Age: 58
Birth place: PA
Township: Perry Twp
Microfilm: Roll 1326, Page 570
[Brøderbund Family Archive #285, Ed. 1, Census Index: Western PA, PENNSYLVANIA CENSUS (WEST), Clarion County, 1870, Date of Import: May 20, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.285.1.10079.16]

Individual: Stewart, William
Race: W
Age: 58
Birth place: PA
Township: Perry Twp
Microfilm: Roll 1326, Page 570 
Stewart, William III (I0006)
 
592 [Brøderbund Family Archive #285, Ed. 1, Census Index: Western PA, PENNSYLVANIA CENSUS (WEST), Clarion County, 1870, Date of Import: May 16, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.285.1.10079.7]

Individual: Stewart, Robert
Race: W
Age: 40
Birth place: PA
Township: Perry Twp
Microfilm: Roll 1326, Page 575

"I reviewed the deeds of the Stewart farm in Porter Township currently owned by my aunt Mrs. Grover Stewart (she has the deeds going back to the early 1830's). The current farm was the result of two separate farm property axquisitions in the 1860's by William Stewart III who subsequently transferred the farm to his son Alexander Stewart, who transferred it to his brother Amos Stewart, who transferred the farm to his brother Robert Stewart, who transferred it to his son Frederick Shick Stewart, who transferred it to my grandfather Burton Harold Stewart, who transferred it to my uncle Grover Stewart. My father was the oldest son, but had decided he didn't want to make the farm his career and thus his younger brother acquired the farm in 1955" (Source - John Frederick Stewart)

On August 22, 1999, while attending a Stewart reunion on the farm of Gover Stewart in Porter Township, Clarion County, I drove by the farm homstead originally owned by Robert Stewart. It is adjacent to the farm currently owned by Janet K. Stewart, wife of Grover Stewart, deceased. The Robert Stewart farm was sold during the past several years to individuals not in the Stewart family. My understanding is that William Stewart III initially purchased the property (1) that was the Robert Stewart farm homestead, which Robert gave to his son Thomas Delbert Stewart, and where Robert and Christena lived until their deaths and (2) that is now is owned by Janet K. Stewart, wife of Grover Stewart, which property William Stewart III gave to his son Amos Stewart, who transferred it to Robert and which Robert later gave to his oldest son, Frederick Shick Stewart, who then built a second house on what is now the Grover Stewart farm where the reunion was held. The Hilliard farm, none of the original buildings remain standing, is just over the hill from the Squirrel Hill Cemetery and two farms away from the farms that Robert and Christena gave to Thomas Delbert Stewart and Frederick Shick Stewart. Robert and Christena Hilliard Stewart also owned and farmed the Hilliard homestead. While in high school, Robert would pass through the Hilliard property on his way to help his brother Amos, who was farming what is now the Grover Stewart farm. Robert and Christena married several years later after courtship at the Oak Grove Presbyterian Church, where she was a life long member. Robert was a member of the Concord Presbyterian Church until his marriage. (Note to file by J.P. Rhein)


 
Stewart, Robert (I0004)
 
593 “Two-fifths of the total of American emigrants in the colonial period came from Ulster - up to 250,000 souls. They appear to have been much less exclusively Protestant than popularly supposed, and included many Anglicans as well as Presbyterians: the predominant 'Ulster Scot' stereotype does not stand up to the statistics, since about 100,000, mostly Catholic, probably came from the south in the same period.

The Ulster Scots, however, stood out: possibly because, even in the New World, they remained ostentatiously separate. Even more importantly, distinctive Ulster Scot communities could evolve because Ulster women emigrated, too - a development not replicated elsewhere in Ireland, except in Dublin, until the nineteenth century.
Once emigration was an established fact, it set up its own self-perpetuating rhythm. Those who went were mostly indentured labour, travelling free; very few were either convicts or independent investors. The claims that they were farmers of substance generally stem from propaganda of one kind or another. Government attitudes were not yet in favour of the phenomenon, especially when it meant losing Protestants; but an interventionist line was never taken (plans in the mid - 1770s to curb emigration were overtaken by events). The whole business of emigration was tightly organized even before the Famine exodus of 1840-41. By 1790 Doyle estimates the number of the United States population of Irish stock at 447,000 - two-thirds of them originating from Ulster.”
(Source - ("Modern Ireland - 1600 to 1972" by R.F. Foster, Published by The Penguin Group, London, England, 1988)
 
Craig, William (I4141)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12



This site powered by The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding, Copyright © 2001-2006, created by Darrin Lythgoe, Sandy, Utah. All rights reserved.